Tuesday, 2 December 2014

It's Beginning To Look A Lot Like Christmas

This last weekend was of course Thanksgiving weekend in the USA, as evidenced by the avalanche of emails I received about Black Friday sales. I was going to blog about all the things I have to give thanks for, which are many, then I realised right now there's one thing I'm thankful for more than ever.

I'm not a particularly religious person but Christmas has always been a special family time for me. When I was growing up in our quiet oceanside village we always had a Christmas tree. It was plastic and seemingly indestructible; each year Simon and I took turns putting the star on top after we decorated it with our parents. It was covered in the usual store bought decorations but also decorations we had made at school and at home, and over time these became icons of our childhood and much reminiscing was done each year when they were put on the tree. This tree survived with my brother and I into our adulthoods and I know somewhere at home it still lives in a box with all of the aforementioned decorations that have not deteriorated to dust from the passing of time.

When I moved to Mount Tamborine in 2004 I also joined in with my bestie's family tradition of decorating the tree and hanging yard lights in the first week of December, usually with much champagne and soft cheese consumption.
2012
Again there was always special attention given to the home made decorations with special photos, messages, names or colouring-in on them. It struck me last week that this was our tenth consecutive year of doing this together.
2004
2006
2007
2007
2012
In 2010 I went to the USA for Christmas so before I left my bestie and her family came to our home and decorated our tree for us, with the help of my Mum and Stan.
2010
Why yes all our decorations ARE heartshaped or
have cats on them.
So this year when we decorated the tree at my bestie's place I took all the usual photos, but I also took a closer look at some of the traditions of the day, and the icons of childhood that had survived the last decade and still made it to the tree. I think they are best illustrated with the words of one of my favourite Christmas Carols.

O Christmas Tree, O Christmas tree,
How lovely are your branches!
In beauty green will always grow
Through summer sun and winter snow.
O Christmas tree, O Christmas tree,
How lovely are your branches!
O Christmas Tree, O Christmas tree,
You are the tree most loved!
How often you give us delight
In brightly shining Christmas light!
O Christmas Tree, O Christmas tree,
You are the tree most loved!
O Christmas Tree, O Christmas tree,
Your beauty green will teach me
That hope and love will ever be
The way to joy and peace for me.
O Christmas Tree, O Christmas tree,
Your beauty green will teach me.

No comments: